Kluang 2014: UK Argo Farm Review (2)

In my previous post, I covered the background of the trip to UK Argo Farm. In this post, I will cover the guided tour itself. As mention, the tour and the feeds required (found in the “goody-bag”) is included in the package stay. And we were brought around the farm in this “bus”.

I like how "open" the bus is. But too bad there weren't free roaming animals around.
I like how “open” the bus is. But too bad there weren’t free roaming animals around.

Tip: DO put on mosquito patch and/or insect repellent before you embark on the trip. In fact, I helped the kids put on both once we reach the farm. There were quite a fair bit of insects around.

The itinerary of the guided tour.

A snapshot of the tour displayed at the main lobby.
A snapshot of the tour displayed at the main lobby.

Sheep Herding
The first stop is to witness the “Sheep Herding”. This is the process where they herd the sheep from one grazing patch to the other. Initially I thought it would be quite boring, but I was wrong. It’s quite a view seeing a big group of sheep moving from one place to another. And according to our friendly guide, Uncle James, some of the sheep at the end of the herd were actually pregnant. You can see the small belly that they have, which is quite cute. The kids definitely enjoyed the “scene” and having such close encounter (without cage or barriers) with them.

The sheep / goat running pass us.
The sheep / goat running pass us.

Feedstock Processing
Next, we walked a short distance to the “feedstock processing factory”. There isn’t much to “see” there but just feedstock. We can’t really see the process itself. But Uncle James provided some basic explanation about the feedstock, goats and the farm. It was quite informative, but maybe a little too long and not interesting enough for younger kids. The boy got a little inpatient near the end of the explanation.

The feedstock before it is being "processed". According to Uncle James, they will add vitamins into the feeds.
The feedstock before it is being “processed”. According to Uncle James, they will add vitamins into the feeds.

Tip: We were silly enough to stand quite close to the feedstock (cause Mommy wants to take photo for the blog). And we didn’t realize that there were many insects near it. They didn’t “bite” but can be quite irritating when they fly to your leg. So keep a good enough distance from it.

Goat Feeding
Behind the feedstock processing “factory”, is the goat pen. This is where the kids finally get some hands on. Feeding the goat! As mention, the feed was provided. So it’s time to take it out and have some fun feeding. And don’t worry, the goat don’t bite. According to Uncle James, even if they do bite, one row of their teeth are soft (think is the upper row), so it won’t hurt. But we didn’t encounter any that bite though. Oh, the farm is thoughtful enough to provide a bin for you to throw away the plastic bags for the feed and a tap for you to wash your hands if you are concern about hygiene.

The boy feeding the goat. His favourite activity for the tour.
The boy feeding the goat. His favourite activity for the tour.

Tip: We realize that the goat prefer the soft grass and wouldn’t really eat the twigs. So don’t bother about feeding them the twigs.

Milk Feeding
As we walk further into the goat pen, there are more goats waiting for us. This time round to feed them milk. You can exchange the coupon in the goody bag for the milk in bottles. Each person is entitled to only one bottle. This I find a little too little, I have to give up mine for the boy to have more chance of feeding.

In order to feed more goats, the boy was bad enough to pull out the bottle from the first goat he fed, and give it to another goat. Oh that poor goat...
In order to feed more goats, the boy was bad enough to pull out the bottle from the first goat he fed, and give it to another goat. Oh that poor goat…

Tip: The kids may not be tall enough to feed some goat. This is because the bottle need to be tilted in order for milk to flow through, much like the bottles human use. So go for the baby goat which are much shorter and ask the kids to raise their arms as high as they can.

Goat Milk Processing
The bus brought us to the milk processing factory. Here, they showed us step by step how they milk the goat. There is some “sterilizing” process to ensure there is no contamination. For the actual milking itself, they uses machines that reminds me of my Medela breast pump. So it’s a pity we won’t allowed to have some “hands-on” milking experience.

Blocked from the view is the breast pump...
Blocked from the view is the breast udders pump…

After watching the milking process, we proceed to the “factory” next to it and again Uncle James explain how the milk is being pasteurized and available for our consumption. Too bad the factory was not in operation when we were there, probably due to weekend. So it gets a little boring for the kids again.

After the short explanation, we were served with goat milk for us to try and purchase if you want. I took a small mouth and I think the “goat-smell” was rather strong.

The girl doesn't seems to mind the taste and had 2 cups. Difference between a milk lover and a normal drinker. (Photo Credits: My SIL)
The girl doesn’t seems to mind the taste and had 2 cups. Difference between a milk lover and a normal drinker. (Photo Credits: My SIL)

Looks like I’m unable to cover all the itinerary of the guided tour in one post. So stay tuned for part 3, where I will share the 2nd part of the tour!

Disclaimer: This is NOT a sponsored post.

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5 thoughts on “Kluang 2014: UK Argo Farm Review (2)

    1. Thanks Michelle. Indeed it was quite fun if the kids love animals. There are more activities I have yet to cover, do check back here for updates. Once again thanks for stopping by. 🙂

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